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February 6, 2015

Teresa Margolles has been awarded the Purificación García Latin American Photography Prize

Teresa Margolles has been awarded the Purificación García Latin American Photography Prize, granted in the Mexican fair Zona Maco.


The Mexican artist Teresa Margolles (Culiacán. Mexico, 1963) has obtained the Purificación García Latin American Photography Prize for her work La esperanza [Hope] of 2014, which is thus incorporated to the Purificación García Photography Collection.


The jury of this edition was comprised by Celia Sredni de Birbragher, director of the magazine Art Nexus and Rosana A. Agrelo, manager of the Purificación García Photography Collection.

Teresa Margolles is one of the most prominent Mexican artists of the current scene. She represented Mexico in the Venice Biennale of 2009 and has exhibited her work in the most prestigious museums and institutions on the international level.

Margolles uses photography, installation, performance and video to analyse the organic death form an artistic viewpoint. Through her work, the artist explores violence, social injustice, repression and drug trafficking in Mexico.


The image shown in La Esperanza was taken by Margolles during her constant documentation of the ravages of the drug trafficking war in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. Upon finding the abandoned premises of what at some time was a family-run business called Abarrotes La Esperanza, the artist began to ask herself about the very concept of hope.


In Greek mythology, when Zeus delivers Pandora’s Box to the men, the last thing that they find in it is hope, and from there comes the idea that “hope dies at the end”. For his part, the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzche affirmed that “hope is the worst of all evils, because it prolongs the torments of man.”


We imagine that when the family made the decision to call their business Abarrotes La Esperanza it did not think of that concept as something residual, but rather at that time it had in mind a hopeful future. At any time did they question what could happen around them? At present, when in the media Juárez is not the most violent city of Mexico, but rather attention is concentrated on Guerrero, does any reason for hope exist there?